What is Bone Resorption?

What is Bone Resorption?

dental implants TulsaPatients that are at risk for bone resorption may be faced with gum disease or tooth loss. One of the solutions when bone loss occurs is to supplant the missing tooth with a dental implant.

Bone resorption can impact individuals in different ways. First understanding that bone resorption is often present in patients that suffer with inflammation from other conditions like arthritis, diabetes, or heart disease may provide clues that will point to issues surrounding gum tissue and the teeth.

In simple terms, bone resorption describes the progression of bone loss due to osteoclast bone cells that literally break down bone resulting in fractures, osteoporosis, or in the dental world, diminished dental roots and jaw bones that can translate into tooth loss. Patients that experience bone resorption may benefit with the intervention of hormones and/or needed minerals to support needed bone growth.

When tooth loss has occurred, a dental implant can be embedded in gum tissue that will ultimately provide the strength and stability the tooth replacement will need. In other words, the implant itself will take over the anchor role of the roots of the tooth it is replacing. [pullquote]When tooth loss has occurred, a dental implant can be embedded in gum tissue that will ultimately provide the strength and stability the tooth replacement will need.[/pullquote]

After the implant is placed, there will be a period of time for existing bone to attach to the implant. This process is called osseointegration, and can take several months. When the dental implant area is healed, the final restoration will be placed.

Your dentist will have fabricated a tooth replacement that will look so lifelike and match neighboring teeth so well, no one will be able to tell the implant from your biological teeth.

When bone resorption occurs it may affect more than one tooth. When this happens, the patient may be faced with having to replace multiple teeth or an entire arch. This can be completed with an implant supported bridge or denture.

Getting the appropriate treatment is critical to more than just appearance to replace lost teeth. Extensive bone loss can impact the shape of the jaw altering the way one eats and speaks.

Once dental implants have been placed and final restorations have been completed, caring for your new smile is just like caring for your natural teeth. Daily brushing and flossing coupled with consistent visits to the dentist for a thorough cleaning and dental exam should allow you to maintain your new smile for your lifetime.